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%% Pyramid Swifty Mouse Review                  By:  Jason Compton      %%
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Well, an overview, really.  It's tough to drive a mouse into the ground
enough to review it fully (unless it's a Commodore mouse, in which case it
takes a month or so)...

These mice last longer.  Actually, even if the brand name is unfamiliar,
you may very well own one of these models...the style is white, glossy
plastic with a two or three button configuration (this one is three),
and the entire top is rather gently curved.  Some models (not this one)
have an Atari/Amiga switch, if you're still an ST type of person.

The major points to make?  The mouse works.  Rather well, really...the
resolution is fairly high and the response is great.  I have used the
two-button make for over a year without complaint, and this three-button
version promises to be more of the same.

The mouse is worth the purchase for the packaging alone...it originates
in Taiwan, and is clearly the product of non-English speakers doing
blind translation...hence the inspirational quote on the bottom of the
box, informing us "A detecting mind never rests,/It's not unlike a finely
tuned musical instruments;/It demands attention, practice." [sic]

Not even Micro R+D, the distributors, know what they're talking about.

Of course, the third button is useless until you arm yourself with a
commodity to take advantage of it, but they're numerous.  No problems
there.

The upshot: For less than $25, this is as good of a mouse as you're
going to get.