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%%  AR Contest Winner                        By:  David Tiberio    %%
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THIS MONTH'S WINNERS:

    Carl Laurence Gonsalves - randomly drawn from 13 correct entries,
    guessing the number 139236 from the drawn number of 147601.

    and goodwinm@mail.cs.orst.edu - randomly drawn from 50 correct and
    incorrect entries in our second chance drawing, guessing the number
    214387 from the drawn number of 212164.

    Both will be able to choose as a prize either the Future Shock II
    audio CD-ROM from SIDEWINDER, or the Amiga Online Reference Manual
    from Area52. The ARexx Reference Disk by Merrill Callaway was
    awarded to last month's winner.


THE PUZZLE:

Since people complained that the first contest was too hard, and
that the second was too easy, I made one that anyone can solve with
a little thought. Once you get some of it decoded you will be able
to solve it with ease ::heh heh::!

Decrypt the following encoded message: 17851 47932

Each location in the code represents one character in the
ASCII character set from A to Z. Also provide your method of
obtaining the answer.


THE WRONG ANSWERS:

No one submitted an incorrect answer, of all entries submitted. One entry
suggested that RAW keycodes were used in the puzzle. This is incorrect,
however he did guess the correct answer.

Francesco "Syylk" Munda writes in his correct entry: "Okey, that was easy,
after all. On "Amiga Report" isn't likely to appear "MSDOS GREAT"... :)"


THE WRONG WAY TO ENTER:

from LILLIQUISTJ@delphi.com:

    "Well,  I couldn't get Delphi to post to you but MAYBE now it'll work.
    Anyhow,  I already publically posted the answer to your puzzle. Sorry!
    I had it nicely type out too."

    Well, that's okay! Just try not to do it again! :)


THE WINNING ANSWER:

The prize winner is Carl Laurence Gonsalves, drawn from the winning
answers.

And here is Carl's correct entry, drawn randomly from all correct entries:

>The puzzle was to decrypt: 17851 47932
>
>The answer is: AMIGA RULES
>
>To solve the puzzle I looked at the numbers carefully. You said that "Each
>location in the code represents one character ... from A to Z". I figured
>this meant each digit represented a letter, and the space was a break
>between the words. The first 5 letter word I thought of that had the same
>first and last letters was Amiga, so I wrote down a table like:
>
>0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
>  A       G   M I
>
>Then I thought, "Okay, where the heck is he getting the numbers from?"
>Looking up at my keyboard I noticed that the letters A-G-M-I had the
>same left-right placement as my table. I then expanded the numbers for
>the second word by counting them and got:
>
>0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
>  A W E R G   M I L
>        S D F     U   O
>        X C V     J
>
>I then wrote down the second word like:
>
>47932
>RMLEV
>FUODS
>VJ CX
>
>And looking across this the only sensible word I could see was "RULES".

Katie Nelson's correct entry, which was not selected as the winning entry
from the 13 correct entries, adds: "PS-- I like the message."

Arnoud W. Morsink's correct entry, which was not selected as the winning
entry from the 13 correct entries, (but wrong method!) identifies a hint
found in another issue of Amiga Report: "Like you said, it wasn't hard
- i.e., after I read the clue in "Programming Hash Tables":

  ("... this word (which I chose as an example for no particular reason).")
:)"

THE BREAKDOWN:

- Since people complained that the first contest was too hard, and
that the second was too easy, I made one that anyone can solve with
a little thought. Once you get some of it decoded you will be able
to solve it with ease ::heh heh::!

    The fastest way to solve this is to note that the first number, 17851,
    begins and ends with a "1", just like the word "AMIGA". As I stated
    in the puzzle, once you got some of it decoded, the rest should be
    easy.

- Decrypt the following encoded message: 17851 47932

    There are two words, and notice that only 10 digits are used. In this
    code, one digit can represent between 3 and 6 characters.

- Each location in the code represents one character in the
ASCII character set from A to Z. Also provide your method of
obtaining the answer.

    Originally I was going to number my fingers from 0 to 9, and then
    touch type a message. Then I decided instead to use the numbers
    based upon the alignment with the characters on the QWERTY keyboard.
    Since people do have different keyboards, future puzzles will not
    rely on the keyboard anymore! ::whew!::


THE DISCLAIMER:

DISCLAIMER: This contest is being provided as a service to the
Amiga community and all persons involved in running this contest
cannot be held liable for anything that costs you money or
lifetime pain and anguish. Rules are subject to change. All entries
must be received by April 30th, 1994. Any entries beyond this date
will be entered into the next contest, if any.


THE APOLOGY:

I learned from the last contest not to use the keyboard, since it may
be different in some countries than the QWERTY keyboard that I use.
I promise not to do it again (I guess the MATRIX puzzle next month
will be the exception ::hint::).


As Edward Cayce might say, that is all for the present...

dtiberio@libserv1.ic.sunysb.edu